Category Archives: Doggie Manners

Dog-Harmony and the Destin Library set to host humane education events

Dog-Harmony has teamed up with the Destin Library to host a lecture series over the next few months. From workshops focusing on educating children to teaching you the difference between service dogs and therapy animals, this series will cover it all.

Upcoming events:
Children’s Humane Education Workshop
Feb. 27 from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Cruelty or Neglect? Responsible Pet Ownership Workshop
Feb. 27 from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

To sign up for these courses, please fill out the following form.

Humane Education Sign up

Dog-Harmony offers group training classes

Dog-Harmony offers community humane education courses featuring group training classes. Nancy Bown, a Certified Professional Dog Trainer-Knowledge Assessed (CPDT-KA) and Dog-Harmony’s founder, leads these courses at Dog-Harmony Headquarters, 3906 U.S. Highway 98 W, Unit 34, Santa Rosa Beach.

For more information about the individual classes, visit Dog-Harmony’s events page.

To sign up for one of these classes, please fill out the form below:

Group Training Class Sign Up

Teaching Your Dog Table Manners

We loved this article from PetBucket!

No one wants a dog that jumps on guests or begs during a dinner party, or that growls at other pets during his own meals. Teaching our canine companions mealtime manners is important, then, both during our meals and their own.

Dogs are scavengers by nature, so vying for food comes easily to them. Having a pet that begs, whines or whimpers while you’re eating is exasperating, however, and can be embarrassing when you have guests over for dinner. Fortunately, teaching Fido to respect your space during mealtime is simple with some consistent training. Start by having him go to his sleeping area or a favourite spot, and then give your dog a command such as “go to your spot” with a treat. Soon, he’ll start associating the command with that space and a tasty reward. Once you’ve mastered this step, you can add the “stay” command, starting from just a few feet away from his spot and slowly working your way backwards. Over time, you will be able to give the command and leave the room entirely, freeing you to enjoy your meal without a barrage of begging. If your dog does approach the table after you’ve told him to “stay,” lead him back to his spot as many times as necessary to get him to stay put. After dinner, be sure to reward your pet for staying in place with plenty of praise and a treat. Read the rest of the article here.