Category Archives: Prevention

Keeping dogs safe in the heat

SANTA ROSA BEACH, Fla. (WJHG/WECP) – The founder of Dog-Harmony joined us in the studio to tell you how you can keep your dogs safe from the heat this summer.

There are some things you can do to make sure they don’t get a heat stroke. One thing is to make sure your pets drink enough water. You also shouldn’t leave them out in the sun too long. If you start to notice that they are panting more or their eyes and gums get red, it is a good idea to bring them inside.

For more tips or information on how you can adopt a dog, check out Paris’ interview. http://www.wjhg.com/content/news/Keeping-dogs-safe-in-the-heat-435582613.html

The Neuter Commuter to roll again

Article here: http://www.nwfdailynews.com/news/20170629/neuter-commuter-to-roll-again

The Neuter Commuter, which provides convenient, low-cost spay/neuter surgeries for dogs and cats, will take its next journey Monday, July 31.

Owners who want their pet sterilized may drop off their pets at Dog-Harmony at 3906 U.S. Highay 98 Unit 34 in Santa Rosa Beach at 6 a.m. The Neuter Commuter will then take the animals to a Panama City clinic for surgeries, according to a press release from Dog-Harmony.

After surgery, the Neuter Commuter will return the animals to Dog-Harmony after 3 p.m. for the owners to pick up.

Owners can arrange for a later pickup time if necessary, the press release said.

The Neuter Commuter and clinic are run by Operation Spay Bay, a nonprofit organization that has performed more than 19,000 spay/neuters.

Dog-Harmony transports the animals for free. Surgery cost is $60 for pets under 50 pounds and $80 for those heavier.

Appointments must be made at least one week in advance.

For more information and/or to make an appointment, call Dog-Harmony at 850-376-4190.

Why does my dog jump and how can I stop him?

We loved this article that Pet Bucket just sent out. We also love Pet Bucket. 🙂  Did you know that Pet Bucket is the best for less expensive medicine? We love them – and if you order through our link here – we also get a discount for our rescue dogs. Our team member (and the one behind our site design) Chelsea uses it all the time for her two dogs. She loves the service, their products, and the cost is so much better than your local vet or online solution (and did you know it’s the same medicine?! It’s not a knock off or a cheaper option – it’s the same!!). Check out more here.

Okay, back to the article about how we can stop our dogs from jumping!

It may be cute in a puppy, but when your full-grown dog jumps up to greet you, it can be a nuisance and dangerous for children and elderly friends. Because dogs jump up to say “hello,” it can be difficult to break them of the habit. With some consistent training, however, you can teach your pet a more polite way to welcome you and your guests.   When puppies greet an older dog, they often lick the adult’s muzzle as an appeasement gesture. In the same way, your canine companion tries to meet you nose-to-nose, jumping on his hind legs to do so. To break your dog of his highflying habit, it is important to show him that you will only greet pets that have all four feet on the ground. If your dog jumps, don’t acknowledge him by pushing him off, but instead look over his head and turn away if necessary. As soon as your dog’s front paws are planted, reward him verbally and with affection or a treat, withdrawing your attention immediately if he hops on his hind legs again. Continue reading here.

Protecting Your Pup from Mosquitoes

Such a great post on The Bark this week. Check it out…

This summer’s routine insect-prevention strategies are taking on a new urgency as public health experts warn that certain parts of the U.S. may experience outbreaks of the Zika virus, which has been linked to birth defects in Latin America.

As you protect yourself from any and all mosquitos this summer, don’t hurt your dog in the process!

The Centers for Disease Control recommends people use insect repellents that use of these ingredients:

  • DEET (used in Off, Deep Woods Off and Cutter)
  • Picaridin
  • IR3535
  • Oil of lemon eucalyptus
  • Para-menthane-diol.

Unfortunately, DEET can be poisonous to your dog. Ingesting it can cause your dog to have stomach problems, conjunctivitis, breathing difficulties and seizures.

Read more here.