Tag Archives: rescue

Preparing your pets for a hurricane

WALTON COUNTY, Fla. (WJHG/WECP) – Pet owners know their animals are more than just cats and dogs. They’re often their best friend and for many leaving their best friend behind while evacuating from a storm is not an option.

“I would take your pets anywhere. I mean, we don’t have any children, this is our child so we will take them everywhere we can with them. There are a lot of hotels that are pet-friendly so they should call and get some information on it and they can definitely find hotels that will accept them,” said Stephanie Kircher, dog owner.

That’s exactly what animal experts say you should do. According to the ASPCA if you need to evacuate you should call ahead to find a shelter or hotel that accepts pets. You also need to put together a hurricane preparedness kit for your pet. The ASPCA suggests a pet first-aid kit, 3-7 days worth of canned or dry food, disposable litter trays, litter or paper toweling, liquid dish soap, disposable garbage bags, pet feeding dishes and water bowls, extra collar or harness as well as an extra leash, photocopies of medical record, at least seven days worth of bottled water for each person and pet, a traveling bag, crate, or sturdy carrier, flashlight, blanket, and recent photos of your pets.

The founder of Dog Harmony, a Santa Rosa Beach dog rescue, suggests pet owners should get their dogs micro-chipped. Some vets and boarding facilities may stay open during storms if you have to leave your animals behind, but finding your options before a storm hits will give you peace of mind.

“Definitely be sure they’re micro-chipped so when you’re traveling. If you happen to lose a dog but you’ve got a way for the dog to be identified so they can be returned to you,” said Nancy Bown, founder of Dog Harmony.

One man we spoke with doesn’t believe any animal should be left behind if a storm threatens the area.

“Would you leave your kid behind? Would you leave anything you cared about behind? To me it’s just I would never do that. At least give them the fighting chance. You don’t want to take care of your pet then at least get it to a place where it can fend for itself. Leaving it behind locked in a cage or something like that is not humane,” said Will Jarrett, dog owner.

Red Cross officials say some of their shelters will be pet friendly if you go to a shelter that is not pet friendly they say they will still do their best to find a spot for you.

Read the whole story here: http://www.wjhg.com/content/news/Preparing-your-pets-for-a-hurricane-443102553.html

You’re Invited! Dog Days of Summer: Social

Original Article here: http://www.wjhg.com/content/news/Dog-days-of-summer-social-440875233.html

SANDESTIN, Fla. (WJHG/WECP) – A guest from Dog Harmony joined us in the studio to tell us about a doggie social for all party animals.

Dog Days of Summer is open to the public and their pets. It is scheduled from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on August 24th at Grand Park in Grand Boulevard at Sandestin.

The event includes live music, a raffle, “pup pops,” brews by Grayton Beer Company and snapper dip by JC’s Gourmet. The outdoor party is free. Donations are asked for refreshments.

The funds from the event will go to Dog-Harmony, a nonprofit in Santa Rosa Beach whose mission is to reduce the number of unwanted dogs at shelters through education, training, low-cost spay/neuter and microchipping.

For more information, watch Paris’ interview.

Breed Labels: When Guesses Turn Into Predictions

As we travel around the country, having conversations with shelters and rescues about the “pit bull” dogs in their care, we find that there are always a few big a-ha! moments that help people understand that all dogs are individuals just a bit better.

One of the more exciting moments typically happens during our Labels & Language presentation where we discuss the role of breed labeling in shelters and the assumptions we make about dogs based on those labels.

Read more here >>

Teaching Your Dog Table Manners

We loved this article from PetBucket!

No one wants a dog that jumps on guests or begs during a dinner party, or that growls at other pets during his own meals. Teaching our canine companions mealtime manners is important, then, both during our meals and their own.

Dogs are scavengers by nature, so vying for food comes easily to them. Having a pet that begs, whines or whimpers while you’re eating is exasperating, however, and can be embarrassing when you have guests over for dinner. Fortunately, teaching Fido to respect your space during mealtime is simple with some consistent training. Start by having him go to his sleeping area or a favourite spot, and then give your dog a command such as “go to your spot” with a treat. Soon, he’ll start associating the command with that space and a tasty reward. Once you’ve mastered this step, you can add the “stay” command, starting from just a few feet away from his spot and slowly working your way backwards. Over time, you will be able to give the command and leave the room entirely, freeing you to enjoy your meal without a barrage of begging. If your dog does approach the table after you’ve told him to “stay,” lead him back to his spot as many times as necessary to get him to stay put. After dinner, be sure to reward your pet for staying in place with plenty of praise and a treat. Read the rest of the article here.

We’re Having A Doggie!

The holidays are a popular time to bring a new dog into your home. They make a wonderful family addition and bring many years of love and fun. Adopting a dog is also a big decision and requires planning and research. Selecting a new pet can also be a very emotional event. Cute puppies with tails wagging and lots of cuddling are often all it takes to win the hearts of a family, but are only part of the criteria used to choose the right pet. We have some ideas on how to choose your match that will bring years of love and companionship to you, and a forever home to a furry friend in need of a loving family.

Whether one chooses a purebred or mix breed dog, pet adoption is available. Approximately 25 to 30 percent of dogs in shelters are purebred, and there are also shelters for specific breeds from which one can adopt. When selecting a dog it is important to understand the general characteristics of the breed. Is the dog very active or is it more of a lap dog? How large will the dog grow and how often will it require grooming? Are their common health traits of the breed that could require special treatment during its life? The answers to these questions will make one more aware of the care required and will help in the selection of a companion who is likely to be a part of a family for a decade or more.

Review your lifestyle to determine the amount of space available for the dog and the environment in which the dog will live. Space is more important to dogs with herding characteristics like Collies or Shetland Sheepdogs that like to run and bark and may nip at people to “gather” them. As a result, an apartment may not be the easiest environment in which to raise dogs with these traits. Older dogs have more mellow personalities and may be easier to introduce and play with children than young puppies.

It is hard to resist a puppy? The young canines are loving, playful and become “forever friends” to their owners. Puppies also offer an opportunity for children to learn responsibility by taking the dog on regular walks or grooming the pet on a regular basis. However, puppies require more time and attention to train and socialize the pet as it adjusts to a new home and family. Housetraining, puppy-proofing a house, and teaching the pet to obey are just some of the tasks of bringing a young dog in to the family. People with full daily schedules may consider adopting an older dog with arrangements for daycare that affords the dog time to walk or run and socialize

There are many other considerations to ponder when bringing a doggie into a family. Dog-Harmony’s “We’re Having a Doggie” program offers consultations on how to select the proper pet and will help find the best match for you. Adopting a dog through Dog-Harmony includes selection consultations, spay/neuter, vaccinations, obedience and crate training, bedding, harness, leash, and socialization for a nominal fee. To encourage a long-lasting relationship, Dog-Harmony will also provide follow-up consultations and training as needed. As you consider a gift for our family this holiday, think about adopting a pet. It will bring many years of happiness to your family and to a dog in search of a loving home.

For more information about adoption services, contact Dog-Harmony at hello@dog-harmony.org or 850-376-4190.

Why does my dog jump and how can I stop him?

We loved this article that Pet Bucket just sent out. We also love Pet Bucket. 🙂  Did you know that Pet Bucket is the best for less expensive medicine? We love them – and if you order through our link here – we also get a discount for our rescue dogs. Our team member (and the one behind our site design) Chelsea uses it all the time for her two dogs. She loves the service, their products, and the cost is so much better than your local vet or online solution (and did you know it’s the same medicine?! It’s not a knock off or a cheaper option – it’s the same!!). Check out more here.

Okay, back to the article about how we can stop our dogs from jumping!

It may be cute in a puppy, but when your full-grown dog jumps up to greet you, it can be a nuisance and dangerous for children and elderly friends. Because dogs jump up to say “hello,” it can be difficult to break them of the habit. With some consistent training, however, you can teach your pet a more polite way to welcome you and your guests.   When puppies greet an older dog, they often lick the adult’s muzzle as an appeasement gesture. In the same way, your canine companion tries to meet you nose-to-nose, jumping on his hind legs to do so. To break your dog of his highflying habit, it is important to show him that you will only greet pets that have all four feet on the ground. If your dog jumps, don’t acknowledge him by pushing him off, but instead look over his head and turn away if necessary. As soon as your dog’s front paws are planted, reward him verbally and with affection or a treat, withdrawing your attention immediately if he hops on his hind legs again. Continue reading here.

Protecting Your Pup from Mosquitoes

Such a great post on The Bark this week. Check it out…

This summer’s routine insect-prevention strategies are taking on a new urgency as public health experts warn that certain parts of the U.S. may experience outbreaks of the Zika virus, which has been linked to birth defects in Latin America.

As you protect yourself from any and all mosquitos this summer, don’t hurt your dog in the process!

The Centers for Disease Control recommends people use insect repellents that use of these ingredients:

  • DEET (used in Off, Deep Woods Off and Cutter)
  • Picaridin
  • IR3535
  • Oil of lemon eucalyptus
  • Para-menthane-diol.

Unfortunately, DEET can be poisonous to your dog. Ingesting it can cause your dog to have stomach problems, conjunctivitis, breathing difficulties and seizures.

Read more here.

Just Adopt The Dog!

Fostering dogs is an integral part of animal rescue. Not only does it help the foster dog learn the proper skills and behavior to be successfully adopted, it also allows more dogs to be saved. The need for foster parents is apparent as it seems that any shelter or rescue can always accept more foster homes.

Unfortunately, in the animal rescue community, it seems common to encounter those (especially online) who make comments about fostering that can actually be very hurtful to those who choose to foster. Click here to read more on BarkPost.